The Lightworker Label

By Rev. Amari Magdalena

“I’m a Lightworker.”  How many times do we see that phrase bandied around on sites promoting metaphysical spirituality?  How often, over the years, have you or I described ourselves as such? I suggest too often.  Why do I say that?  Semantics often get in the way of communication and communion with our other humans on the planet.  This is one of those words/expressions that separates.

If you and I say we are “light workers” we are in fact saying that we are somehow special or above the fray of those who do not espouse our metaphysical beliefs.  Isn’t that what religions have done for eons resulting in alienation and wars over the chasms created by separateness?

I understand the pride that goes along with this type of label and how intoxicating it may be.  It says, “I’m special.” However, for those not on that boat, it suggests superiority, condescension, and haughtiness.  Oh, not that you/we intended that, yet it certainly is the hidden result of such verbiage.

Let’s consider a metaphysical principal that we are all an aspect of the Divine or Creative Source.  If we truly embrace that value, then how on earth can we use a term that suggests that only a select few embody that?  Doesn’t make a whole lot of sense when viewed through that lens, does it?

A greater result of embracing the lightworker label, is feeling unique; another game of life to assuage our inner demons of self-doubt.  I’d suggest in a world that has failed to recognize the very specialness and talents of each person on the planet, many need to somehow stand out.

If I had the gift of creating a more equitable and affirming world, I would make sure that every single being on the planet were acknowledged for their particular talent and how it enhances the greater good.  I am reminded of stories about aboriginal people in Australia.  Interdependence was highly valued along with appreciation for each person’s contribution to the greater good.

Another aspect of this that comes to mind is, in my opinion, failing to understand duality, polarity, and separation.  At the risk of sounding like a broken record yet again, I repeat, “We are here to experience separation.”  Our mastery, should it come, lies in recognizing that separation and arresting judgment. Perhaps learning the old Native American adage of walking in another person’s moccasins. Also embracing the Tao without weighting opposites with too much emphasis.

There have indeed been persons on the earth who on grand and smaller scale have done some horrific things.  They’ve annihilated groups, fostered hatred, murdered, blundered etc. Yet, I’d ask you, how is it that you do not see their mastery in the sense that the ill they did, may have awakened great good? Is it not day and night?  Light and dark?  Opposites on a compendium that offers us the possibility of creating balance?

Truly, I understand, that choosing a spiritual path dedicated to enlightment and doing acts of good is commendable. Using language that separates is the antidote to that good, don’t you see? I advise, go on elevating your consciousness and performing acts of great goodness and kindness.  That will surely make for a better world.  Just please, surrender the judgment through the label lightworker that places others in the abyss.  If you want to help others, find the light in them, and affirm it.

“A good person can make another person good; it means that goodness will elicit goodness in the society; other persons will also be good.”  Bhumibol Adulyadej

“Enlightened leadership is spiritual if we understand spirituality not as some kind of religious dogma or ideology but as the domain of awareness where we experience values like truth, goodness, beauty, love and compassion, and also intuition, creativity, insight and focused attention.” Deepak Chopra